Alfred Farndale
5 July 1897 to 30 May 1987 

 The Tidkinhow Line

The Wensleydale Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAR00683

 

 

Soldier in WW1 and farmer in Wensleydale 

  

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Born

 

Alfred Farndale son of Martin and Catherine Jane Farndale, formerly Lindsay, (FAR00364) born Tidkinhow Farm.

(BR and family knowledge)

Alfred Farndale registered Guisbro District Oct-Dec 1897

(GRO Vol 9d page 487, 1837 online)

 

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Lived

 

Military Service:

83795 Private Alfred Farndale, Machine Gun Corps, awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. Served in France, Iraq and India. In World War 2 served as a Special Constable and was awarded the Police War Medal.

(Medal Rolls)


Married

Alfred Farndale, bachelor, farmer aged 29 son of Martin Farndale (deceased), married Margaret Louise Baker, spinster of Leeming Bar daughter of Arthur Baker JP (deceased) at Bedale Parish Church, on 16 Mar 1928.

(MC)

 

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Alfred and Peggy Baker wedding in March 1928 at Bedale

 

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Bedale Church taken in December 1986

 

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The voyage to Canada

 



 

 

Lived

Alfred Farndale was born on 5 July 1897 at Tidkinhow Farm, Stranghow, Skelton, son of Martin Farndale, farmer and Catherine Farndale, formerly Lindsay. He was the youngest of twelve children.

He went to a local school and was working at home when the war broke out in 1914. He joined the East Yorkshire Regiment in 1916, but then volunteered for the Machine-Gun Corps and served on the front line with 239th Company at Ypres in France until mid 1917 when he went to Mesopothamia and served in action there until the end of the war.

He married Margaret Louise Baker (of Audlem, Cheshire) at Bedale Parish Church on 16 March 1928. Immediately after the wedding, they both went to break open Prairie in Canada, where three of his elder brothers and two sisters were doing the same thing. He built a house for his family in Huxley in 1928.


Alfred and Margaret Farndale, after emigrating to Canada in March1928, remained there until 1935. The slump of the late twenties and early thirties was crippling and the family was forced to return to England in 1935.

 

On their return to England Alfred farmed first at Middleton-One-Row, near Darlington, then at Thornton-le-Moor until 1940. They then lived in Northallerton until 1943 when they took Gale Bank Farm, Wensley. Throughout the Second World War, he served as a Special Constable.

 

They retired in 1971 to Leyburn.

 

They had four children, Martin Baker (born Trochu, Alberta, 6 January 1929); Marianne Catherine (born 30 October 1930, Trochu); Alfred Geoffrey (born Trochu 10 April 1932) and Margaret Lindsey (born at Thornton-le-moor on 8 October 1937).

He led a long, varied and active life as a farmer, soldier and pioneer of Western Canada.

 

 

 

By the time the youngest brother, Alfred, and his wife Margaret (Peggy) plus younger sister Grace, arrived in Alberta in 1928, the family was well known in the District. These two members of the Farndale family settled in the Huxley district. They lived first with Alfred's elder brother, Martin, near Trochu while Alfred built their house on Section 27, opposite Ralph Hogg's hill, and was two stories, with white walls and a black roof, which stood out for miles around. The chimney was the only part built of brick, and was made by Frank Holmes. It still stood for many years into the 1990s, but was uninhabited from 1935. They built a wind pump and several barns and later Alfred took another quarter section just east of Huxley on the Wickiser Place. In 1929, their eldest son, Martin was born to be followed in 1930 by Marianne (Anne) and in 1932, by Geoffrey. In 1930 Gladys Grist from Trochu came to help look after the children. She was later to marry Aubrey, son of Ralph Hogg who was Alfred's nearest neighbour. Her son Philip later lived at their house and farmed most of the Farndale farm.

Alfred had fought with the British army in World War I and completed a unique team of three brothers who fought with the Canadian, British and American Armies in that terrible war. He was a member of the British Legion and attended many an armistice parade in Huxley, by the War Memorial, outside the Memorial Hall. In 1934, Grace married Howard Holmes, who farmed south-west of Huxley until he died in 1955. Grace then moved to Calgary where she lived until she returned to Leyburn in Yorkshire where she lived close to Alfred and Peggy.

But the early thirties were hard on the Prairie. It was hard to get a crop at all, and when they did, the price was poor, often hardly paying the elevator dues. The work was nearly all done by horses, but Allred bought one of the first tractors in 1930. During the long hot summers, Peggy often took the family to the mountains at Banff, and to the coast at Vancouver, and Victoria. Otherwise life consisted of hard work and self made entertainment. Bridge parties were common in winter and picnics in summer, with expeditions to the newly started Stampede in Calgary, or fishing at Sylvan Lake. In winter life depended on the horse, either to ride or in a sleigh. The 'rack' bodies were taken off their wheels and put onto runners to get hay to the cattle. Meat was buried in the frozen ground to keep, but the houses were always warm. On one occasion Alfred's dog ripped its tongue out by licking the frozen railway line near Huxley, to which it had stuck, so intense was the cold. He had to be shot. The call of the coyote was constantly heard and returning late one evening skunk in the chicken house, which on being shot left a pungent smell for a long time.

 

Looking back on those days they still remember John Hibbs, the postman, driving his buggy up to the farms from Huxley whistling and singing at the top of his voice. Other neighbours well remembered, were Jake Miller, who farmed to the east, Wagstaffsrds, and Billy Morris. On Huxley road were the Thongs he Shorts, by the slough; then the Delaneys. Huxley was a flourishing little community in those days, with Roach's store and Miss Hibb's confectionary store. There was Mr McMillan garage and even a Chinese restaurant! There were perhaps a couple of hundred people in all. The grain elevator played its vital part in prairie life, and still marked the little township from many miles away in the 1980s.

There were many excitements; hail storms, dust storms and the snow. The heat, the mosquitoes, the fresh prairie air, the stillness, blue skies, bright stars at night, brilliant sunrises, and sunsets, and always in the distance the rockies often covered in snow even in summer. The startling cloud formations and the sudden thaw with the arrival of the Chinook wind. Indians travelling round to cut the brush; Sergeant Hammond of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the stories of the Mad Trapper. On one occasion, young Martin aged 4 or 5, was lost on the prairie, causing great concern and a massive search for the corn was high and he was small and the danger great. But finally he was picked up, having walked almost all the way to Huxley, by one of the MacMillans.

The gophers and the jack rabbits were everywhere and the countryside was brown with the plough in spring, and yellow with wheat as far as the eye could see in Summer. These are the sights and memories which, once experienced, can never be forgotten.

But the years of crop failure and poor prices took their toll. The money ran out and Alfred was forced to return to England with his family in 1935. Sadly came the farm sale in March, and the family went to spend the last days in Alberta with Grace and Howard Holmes at their ranch near Huxley. It was well below zero on 8th April 1935 when they caught the train to Edmonton where they began the five day journey to Halifax to catch the Duchess of Atholl for Liverpool. The family moved three times in Yorkshire before settling down in Wensleydale. World War 2 came and went and in 1946 their son Martin joined the British Army. He served in Egypt, Malaya, South Arabia and Ireland and was involved in stopping the war in Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). In 1955 he married Margaret Anne Buckingham and had a son, Richard. Sister Anne married Norman Shepherd who worked for the BBC in Glasgow. They had two sons and a daughter, Stephen, David and Catherine. Geoffrey continued to run the family farm in Wensleydale with daughter, Christine, and son. Nigel. In 1937, Alfred and Peggy had a second daughter, Margot, who married William Atkinson and they had a son, William, and two daughters, Susan and Judith. (Our Huxley Heritage)



Family

Martin Baker Farndale, born 6 Jan 1929 Trochu, Canada (FAR00911).

Marion Catherine Farndale, born 30 Oct 1930, Trochu Canada (FAR00915).

Alfred Geoffrey Farndale, born 10 Apr 1932, Elnora Canada, (FAR00922).

Margaret Susan Farndale, born 8 Oct 1937 Thornton-le-Moor, (FAR00952).



 






 

 

The Kinseys and Farndales in about 1931

 

                                                     Martin Farndale        George Farndale          Ruth Farndale  Will Kinsey                  Alfred Farndale   Jim Farndale

                Alfred Kinsey       Edna Farndale             Jimmy Farndale   Martin Farndale         Grace Farndale 

                                                                                       Dorothy Kinsey                                                 Janie Farndale

 

(Mary Farndale, Anne Farndale)

 

 

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The Canadian Farndales at the Kinseys in about 1931

 

Martin          Jim                                                    Kate                Grace                              George                                                Alfred

 

 

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At the Kinseys in about 1933

 

                                                                                                                Alfred Kinsey

 

                     Alfred Farndale           Dorothy Kinsey     Peggy Farndale     Grace Holmes   Martin Farndale           Bill Kinsey

                                                                                            Anne Farndale

                                                                                                       Kate Farndale                  Howard Holmes


Died

Alfred Farndale, died of prostate cancer aged 89 on 30th May 1987 at Ruston Hospital in Northallerton. He was cremated at Darlington and his memorial stands in Wensley Churchyard.

Margaret Farndale died at Leyburn on 17th November 1996 age 95. She was cremated at Darlington and her Memorial is in Wensley Churchyard.

(DR)

(Most of above from family knowledge)

 

 

He died on 30 May 1987 aged 89 years at Rutson Hospital, Northallerton. He was cremated at Darlington and his grave lies in Wensley churchyard

 

 

 

 

Family photos in Alberta:

 

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Peggy with Geoff?                                                       Martin                                                                  Anne

 

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Geoff?                                                      Anne

 

 

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Harvest time on the prairie

 

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Alfred in 1902

 

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The boys of Tidkinhow in about 1910.

 

John, James, Alfred, William, George and inset Martin

 

                                                            

Alfred about 1920

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred in 1930

 

 

 

Alfred in 1940

 

 

The Farndale House in Alberta (the house that Alfred built)

 

 

 

Alfred building the Farndale House on arrival in Alberta                    The porch of the Farndale House

 

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The House that Alfred Built

 

 

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Alfred Farndale’s House, Huxley (it no longer stands)

 

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Martin Farndale in front of Alfred Farndale’s house in July 1973

 

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George Kinsey and Aubrey Hogg outside the Farndale house at Huxley in July 1973

 

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The Farndale House, Huxley taken from Hoggs’ Place in July 1973

 

 

The lilac hedge and the grain bins

 

 

 

Holidays in the Rockies and Sylvan lake (middle left photo is Martin and Anne taken by lake in Rocky Mountains in 1934)

 

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More holiday photos                                                                                                                                                  Taken in Victoria, British Columbia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

The voyage to Canada in 1928

 

 

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The cottages at Scorton where Grace Farndale and Margaret Baker (later married Alfred) had a poultry farm in about 1922

 

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Alfred at Scorton 1927

 

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Alfred at Tidkinhow in 1927

 

 

 Talk between Alfred Farndale and his son, Martin on 29 July 1982

"I remember going to school at Charltons near Tidkinhow. We then went to Standard 1 at Boosbeck. We stayed there until we were 14. It was a two mile walk each day. The headmaster was Mr Ranson. I remember Jim, my elder brother catching me fishing and playing truant. He just said "Get in" (he was in a pony and trap) and he took me to a days marketing at Stokesley. I remember the second masters name was Ackroyd. I got a fork through my leg and he sucked it out. We were always inspected as we arrived at school. We had to walk passed the Bainbridge place and people used to say that he had more sheep on the moor than he was allowed. I remember William looking after me at mother's funeral. I was crying and very upset.

The war came in 1914 and I was just 17. I wanted to join up so I ran away and joined up at the local recruiting office at Northallerton, somewhere in South Parade I think. I joined the West Yorks but my father found out and said I was under age, which I was. The CO wanted me to stay on the band, but father wouldn't hear of it and I came out. I remember being very proud of my first leave in uniform. Then one day they called for volunteers for the Machine-Gun Corps and I stepped forward. We went to Belton Park, near Grantham for training. I joined 239th Company MGC and we were attached to the Middlesex Regiment. In 1917 we sailed for Calais and went to "Dickiebush" Camp. We were first in action at Westbrook and Polygon Wood. I remember an incident on the Menin Road galloping up with two limbers of ammunition towards the gun positions at Hooge. I was a Private but I was giving a lift to Quarter Master Sergeant Zaccarelli. The Germans started to shell us. They could clearly see us. I had one horse killed and I managed to cut him free and I then rode the other. Zaccarelli was killed; it was quite a party when I reported it. My Captain asked if there were any witnesses but there were none, otherwise I might have got something. I remember an officer coming up to me when we were under bombardment at Ypres and saying "How would you like to be in Saltburn now, Farndale?" We saw some action at Zonnebeke, Ploegstraat and Arras. Then suddenly we were ordered to Marseilles and got on a troopship for Basra in Mesoptamia. After about 14 days we were in the Suez Canal and then the Red Sea. We landed at Basra and marched to Kut-el-Amara as part of a force under General Maud to relieve Townsend. About the middle of 1918 the Turks surrendered. We hung around for quite a while. I cut my thumb on a bully beef tin and it got poisoned. I was in hospital in Kut when 239th Company left for England. I eventually got to Mosul where I thought my unit was and met my platoon commander Lieutenant Pearson. He asked me where I had been and put me in charge of the officers mess. We had some Punjabi officers at the time and they used to knock me up to try to get whiskey! Later in 1918 we were ordered to Bombay. I remember I had to take my stripes down on the troopship. We were sent up to the Afghan frontier for a while and we had quite a lot of trouble in the local bazaars.

Eventually in early 1919 I think, we got a troopship to England. We landed at Southampton. I remember we were told that we could keep our greatcoats or take £1 when we were demobbed on Salisbury Plain. I took the £1! I remember arriving at Middlesborough station very late at night and sleeping on the platform. I got the first train next day to Guisborough and actually arrived at Tidkinhow before they were up! This would be in 1919. I know that I was clear of the army by the start of 1920. I wish I had stayed in. I really did like the army life. But I had to come out.

I then went to Tancred Grange to help my eldest sister Lynn whose husband had died in 1918. I spent my time between Tancred and Tidkinhow till I married your mother on 16 March 1928 at Bedale Parish Church. Martin was over from Canada and he was best man. It was just after my father died in January 1928. My eldest brother, John took over Tidkinhow. Peggy and I had already decided to join the 'Canadians' [his brothers Jim, Martin and George and his sister Kate] in Alberta. We went to Huxley and rented a section of the CPR and you three children were born. However we had bad luck with crops and the slump and we had to go back to England in 1935.

We had a farm in Middleton-One-Row in 1936 and then we moved to Sycamore Lodge at Thornton-le-Moor near Northallerton in 1937. That was where Margot was born. It was too small though and we left it in 1940 after the war had started. We then lived at 117 Crosby Road, Northallerton. I was a farm contractor doing ploughing and threshing. It was very hard work and very long hours. I was Special Constable as well. Then, in January 1943, we moved to Gale Bank Farm at Wensley. We had been looking for farms for years and this was easily the best, so our luck had changed. It was then about 400 acres, but now it is more. Peggy and I retired in 1972 and we are now living at "Highfields", Eller Close Road, Leyburn."

 

 

 

 

Gale Bank Farm

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred in Canada

 

              

 

Alfred’s wedding                                                                                                                                Margaret Louise Baker (Peggy) in about 1925  

 

 

Alfred’s family

 

Military Service

83795 Private Alfred Farndale Machine-Gun Corps

Awarded British War Medal, issued 17 March 1922

Awarded Victory Medal, issued 17 March 1922

Enlisted into 88th Training Reserve Battalion at Northallerton 13 December 1915

Relegated to the Army Reserve (under age) 14 December 1915

Mobilised 6 December 1916

Transferred to the Machine-Gun Corps 30 January 1917

Posted to 239th Company MGC BEF 13 July 1917

Posted to 18th Indian Divisional Battalion 10 January 1919


Posted to 17th Indian Divisional Battalion 10 January 1920

Transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on demobilisation on 19 March 1920

Discharged 31 March 1920 on General Demobilisation

Summary

Service with the colours from 6 December 1916 to 18 March 1920 (3 years and 3 months)

Service Overseas BEF from 13 July to 13 October 1917 (3 months)

Service overseas Iraq and India from 14 October 1917 to 9 January 1920 (2 years and 3 months)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alfred’s daughters, Anne and Margot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    

 

Alfred East Yorks 1914

 

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Machine Gun Corps at Belton Park, Grantham in 1917

 

 

Ypres, France, 1917 (Alfred centre, rear)

 

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                                                                       Alfred in Mesopotamia 1917 to 1918

 

 

 

 

 

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Alfred with his sister, Dorothy                                                                     Alfred with his brother John in about 1960 in Guisborough

 

 

 

 

 Peggy’s photographs

 

 

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Peggy’s photographs

 

 

Aubrey and Glady Hogg who were the neighbours of the Farndales at Huxley, during a visit by Martin Farndale in July 1973

 

 

Lunch at the Hoggs in 1973

 

 

Alfred then known by all as ‘Gran’ at Gale Bank Farm in the 1980s

 

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Alfred and Peggy’s Golden Wedding, 16 March 1978

 

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                                                                         Geoff                                                  Anne                                                       Martin

 

                                                                                          Peggy                                               Margot                                                         Alfred

 

 

Martin jokes with Alfred and Anne

 

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Peggy (Granny) amongst grandchildren

 

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Grace with Stephen                                                                                                                Anne and husband Norman

 

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                    Geoff                                              Anne                                                   Martin

 

                    Peggy (Granny)                             Margot                                              Alfred (Gran)

 

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Alfred and Peggy cut the cake

 

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         Gran under the tree at Gale Bank Farmhouse                                                                 Granny at Eller Close Road

 

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The house at Eller Close Road, Leyburn where Alfred and Peggy retired

 

 

 

Alfred’s wider family in 1986

 

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                                     Geoff                                                                             Martin

 

                                        Anne                      Alfred                                   Peggy                               Margot

 

At Gale Bank in about 1986

 

 

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Geoffrey’s family in about 1986

 

                            Nigel                               Barbara                     Christine                              Geoff