.

 

John George Farndale
27 November 1836 to 21 February 1909

 

 The Ontario 1 Line

 

 

 

 

FAR00337

 

 

Printer’s apprentice before he emigrated to Ontario (possibly via Australia)

He took part in the battles of Alma, Balaclava and Inkerman and was at the Siege of Sebastopol 

  

Home Page

The Farndale Directory

Farndale Themes

Farndale History

Particular branches of the family tree

Other Information

General Sir Martin Farndale KCB

Links

 

Born

 

John George Farndale son of John & Martha Farndale (FAR00217) of Skelton Barnes, baptised, Skelton.

(Skelton PR & IGI)

There is more information about the Ontario Farndales

 


Lived

 

Census 1841 - Long Newton, Stockton:

John George Farndale, aged 5; son of John Farndale (FAR00217); born York, (ie born1836).


 

Census 1851 - Skelton:

John George Farndale, age 14; printer’s apprentice at Skelton; lodger to Timothy Robinson; born Skelton, (ie born 1836).


 

Military Service

John George Farndale, a soldier in The Crimea. See letters. Aged about 17.

 

Service: About 1853-56 in the Crimea in the 28th of Foot a Yorkshire Regiment.

 

He took part in the battles of Alma, Balaclava and Inkerman and was at the Siege of Sebastopol – see his letters below.

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

See also the military Farndales.

See more detailed research into his Crimean campaign below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Travelled

John George Farndale, went to Canada in 1870 and there is an un-substantiated story that he went to Australia first. He lived the rest of his life in Ontario Canada.


John George Farndale visited England twice in 1890 and in 1901. See Letters.

(Family letters)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Married

John George Farndale, aged 33, (must have been 43?), a Methodist, son of John and Martha Farndale, of Yorkshire, England (FAR00217), married Elizabeth Sanderson aged 27, a Methodist, daughter of Richard and Martha Sanderson of Vaughan, Ontario, at Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada, on 24th March 1880. Witnesses Thomas and Jane Sanderson. The Rev J Thompson officiated.

(MC)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family:

Charles Farndale, born Ontario in 1881 (FAR00572).

George Farndale, born Ontario in 1882 (FAR00580).

Albert Farndale, born Ontario 1884 (FAR00598).

Mark Farndale, born Ontario 1885 (FAR00603).

Martha Teresa Farndale, born Ontario 1887 (FAR00624).

Ann Maria Farndale, born Ontario 1889 (FAR00636).

(Family letters)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Died

John George Farndale, died on 21st February 1909 at Chinquacousy, Ontario aged 72, a widower, farm labourer of Yorkshire, England.

(DC)


Buried: John George Farndale, buried at Brampton Cemetery, Ontario with his wife Elizabeth and his daughter Martha Teresa, who died on 7th January 1986, aged 99, a spinster.

(Burial Records)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research into John’s service in the Crimea. We have his letters (see above). But it is very difficult to track him down to the military records. It seems likely that he used an assumed name, a runway apprentice.

 

The Dagger research:

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a black background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

The Marshall research:

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

A group of people posing for a photo

Description automatically generated

 

This photograph is of John George Farndale and his family taken in about 1887 in Canada - his family left to right are George, Teresa, Mark, Charles and Albert

 

 

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

 

Siege of Sevastopol (1854–1855)

 

 

 

The siege of Sevastopol (at the time called in English the siege of Sebastopol) lasted from October 1854 until September 1855, during the Crimean War. The allies (French, Ottoman, and British) landed at Eupatoria on 14 September 1854, intending to make a triumphal march to Sevastopol, the capital of the Crimea, with 50,000 men. The 56-kilometre (35 mi) traverse took a year of fighting against the Russians. Major battles along the way were Alma (September 1854), Balaklava (October 1854), Inkerman (November 1854), Tchernaya (August 1855), Redan (September 1855), and, finally, Sevastopol (September 1855). During the siege, the allied navy undertook six bombardments of the capital, on 17 October 1854; and on 9 April, 6 June, 17 June, 17 August, and 5 September 1855.

 

Sevastopol is one of the classic sieges of all time. The city of Sevastopol was the home of the Tsar's Black Sea Fleet, which threatened the Mediterranean. The Russian field army withdrew before the allies could encircle it. The siege was the culminating struggle for the strategic Russian port in 1854–55 and was the final episode in the Crimean War.

 

During the Victorian Era, these battles were repeatedly memorialized. The siege of Sevastopol was the subject of Crimean soldier Leo Tolstoy's Sebastopol Sketches and the subject of the first Russian feature film, Defence of Sevastopol. The Battle of Balaklava was made famous by Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade" and Robert Gibb's painting The Thin Red Line. A panorama of the siege itself was painted by Franz Roubaud.

The Jamaican and English nurses who treated the wounded during these battles were much celebrated, most famously Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale.

 

 

 

 

Battle of Balaklava

 

The Battle of Balaclava, fought on 25 October 1854 during the Crimean War, was part of Siege of Sevastopol (1854–55) to capture the port and fortress of SevastopolRussia's principal naval base on the Black Sea. The engagement followed the earlier Allied victory in September at the Battle of the Alma, where the Russian General Menshikov had positioned his army in an attempt to stop the Allies progressing south towards their strategic goal. Alma was the first major encounter fought in the Crimean Peninsula since the Allied landings at Kalamita Bay on 14 September, and was a clear battlefield success; but a tardy pursuit by the Allies failed to gain a decisive victory, allowing the Russians to regroup, recover and prepare their defence.

 

 

The thin red line

 

The Russians split their forces. Defending within the allied siege lines was primarily the Navy manning the considerable static defenses of the city and threatening the allies from without was the mobile Army under General Menshikov.

 

The Allies decided against a slow assault on Sevastopol and instead prepared for a protracted siege. The British, under the command of Lord Raglan, and the French, under Canrobert, positioned their troops to the south of the port on the Chersonese Peninsula: the French Army occupied the bay of Kamiesch on the west coast whilst the British moved to the southern port of Balaclava. However, this position committed the British to the defence of the right flank of the Allied siege operations, for which Raglan had insufficient troops. Taking advantage of this exposure, the Russian General Liprandi, with some 25,000 men, prepared to attack the defences around Balaclava, hoping to disrupt the supply chain between the British base and their siege lines.

 

The battle began with a Russian artillery and infantry attack on the Ottoman redoubts that formed Balaclava's first line of defence on the Vorontsov Heights. The Ottoman forces initially resisted the Russian assaults, but lacking support they were eventually forced to retreat. When the redoubts fell, the Russian cavalry moved to engage the second defensive line in the South Valley, held by the Ottoman and the British 93rd Highland Regiment in what came to be known as the "Thin Red Line". This line held and repulsed the attack; as did General James Scarlett's British Heavy Brigade who charged and defeated the greater proportion of the cavalry advance, forcing the Russians onto the defensive. However, a final Allied cavalry charge, stemming from a misinterpreted order from Raglan, led to one of the most famous and ill-fated events in British military history – the Charge of the Light Brigade.

 

 

 

 

The Charge of the Light Brigade

 

BY ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

 

I

Half a league, half a league,

Half a league onward,

All in the valley of Death

   Rode the six hundred.

“Forward, the Light Brigade!

Charge for the guns!” he said.

Into the valley of Death

   Rode the six hundred.

 

II

“Forward, the Light Brigade!”

Was there a man dismayed?

Not though the soldier knew

   Someone had blundered.

   Theirs not to make reply,

   Theirs not to reason why,

   Theirs but to do and die.

   Into the valley of Death

   Rode the six hundred.

 

III

Cannon to right of them,

Cannon to left of them,

Cannon in front of them

   Volleyed and thundered;

Stormed at with shot and shell,

Boldly they rode and well,

Into the jaws of Death,

Into the mouth of hell

   Rode the six hundred.

 

IV

Flashed all their sabres bare,

Flashed as they turned in air

Sabring the gunners there,

Charging an army, while

   All the world wondered.

Plunged in the battery-smoke

Right through the line they broke;

Cossack and Russian

Reeled from the sabre stroke

   Shattered and sundered.

Then they rode back, but not

   Not the six hundred.

 

V

Cannon to right of them,

Cannon to left of them,

Cannon behind them

   Volleyed and thundered;

Stormed at with shot and shell,

While horse and hero fell.

They that had fought so well

Came through the jaws of Death,

Back from the mouth of hell,

All that was left of them,

   Left of six hundred.

 

VI

When can their glory fade?

O the wild charge they made!

   All the world wondered.

Honour the charge they made!

Honour the Light Brigade,

   Noble six hundred!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A screenshot of text

Description automatically generated

 

The Gorst Research

 

A close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generatedA close up of a newspaper

Description automatically generatedA close up of text on a white background

Description automatically generated